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Lehigh Carbon Community College

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LCCC Designated as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Two-Year Education

The National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security have designated Lehigh Carbon Community College as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Two-Year Education (CAE2Y). The designation is through academic year 2023. This designation means that LCCC now has a position on the cyber defense landscape.

CAE SealThe National Centers of Academic Excellence in Cybersecurity (NCAE-C) Program’s History

In 1999, the National Security Agency (NSA) launched the Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education (CAE-IAE) program. Under this program, an institution could receive the CAE-IAE designation if it passed rigorous curriculum and program requirements.
Connect with the CAE Community

LCCC is one of 10 higher-education institutions in Pennsylvania with this designation and the only community college.

Higher education plays a key role in addressing the critical shortage of professionals with the skills to contribute to the protection of the National Information Infrastructure. NSA and DHS partner with academic institutions to enhance cybersecurity education nationwide and to develop the next generation of cyber security experts. Prospective schools are designated after meeting stringent CAE criteria and mapping curricula to topics such as cyber threats, data analysis, cryptography, policy, ethics and more.

These criteria are common to all of the four-year institutions that have earned this designation and should allow LCCC students increased transfer opportunities to some of the nation’s top universities.

While many cybersecurity jobs are open to students who attend an accredited cyber degree program, the additional designation helps to ensure that they are studying concepts and practices deemed important by two of the largest employers in the cybersecurity world: the National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security.


National Cyber League

LCCC once again hosted a cyber security team that competed in the National Cyber League (https://www.nationalcyberleague.org/) competition, in which over 3,000 students competed nationwide.

LCCC’students included Silver Bracket participants Joanne Nacipucha, Juan Parrales and Joshua Urmy (pictured), as well as Arlington Bell, Malik Camacho, Langston Hollomon, Timothy Lehman, Garrett Stinnard, Dominique Totani, Ethan Williams and Gabrielle Grafenberg. Urmy was LCCC’s highest scorer.


Cyber Security Lab

LCCC’s Cyber Center

Contact
Susan Miner
Professor, Computer Science and Networking
POC Center for acdemic excellence in cyber defense
Phone: 610-799-1029
Email: sminer@lccc.edu

Blaine Easterwood, MSE
Instructor, Computer Science
Phone: 610-799-1050
Email: beasterwood@lccc.edu

National Cyber League

LCCC once again hosted a cyber security team that competed in the National Cyber League (https://www.nationalcyberleague.org/) competition, in which over 3,000 students competed nationwide.

LCCC’ students included Silver Bracket participants Joanne Nacipucha, Juan Parrales and Joshua Urmy, as well as Arlington Bell, Malik Camacho, Langston Hollomon, Timothy Lehman, Garrett Stinnard, Dominique Totani, Ethan Williams and Gabrielle Grafenberg. Urmy was LCCC’s highest scorer.

Computer Science Advisory Committee

LCCC consults with a Computer Science Advisory Committee, which is a vital component or our institution. This group is dedicated to the field of computer science. The committee is composed of a group of experienced professionals, experts, and leaders within the computer science industry who provide strategic guidance, support, and oversight to ensure that the computer science programs and initiatives offered by the institution remain relevant, competitive, and aligned with the ever-evolving technological landscape.

The primary objectives and responsibilities of a Computer Science Advisory Committee typically include:

  • Curriculum Development: The committee collaborates with academic faculty and administrators to review and update the computer science curriculum, ensuring that it incorporates the latest industry trends, emerging technologies, and best practices.
  • Program Enhancement: Committee members work to identify areas for program improvement, including the introduction of new courses, projects, and research initiatives that prepare students for the challenges and opportunities in the field.
  • Industry Engagement: Through their extensive industry connections and knowledge, committee members help establish and strengthen partnerships with technology companies, startups, and research organizations. These partnerships can facilitate internships, co-op opportunities, and job placements for students.
  • Research and Innovation: The committee may support and guide research initiatives within the institution, offering insights into the most promising areas for research and helping secure funding for research projects.
  • Professional Development: By sharing their expertise and insights, advisory committee members can contribute to faculty and staff development, ensuring that educators stay current with industry developments.
  • Student and Alumni Engagement: The committee may participate in events, mentoring programs, and career services to engage with students and alumni. This helps in understanding the needs and concerns of those pursuing careers in computer science.
  • Industry Trends and Forecasting: Advisers keep the institution informed about emerging technologies and trends, which can guide strategic planning and resource allocation.
  • Quality Assurance: They provide an external perspective on the quality and effectiveness of the computer science programs and suggest improvements as needed.
  • Networking Opportunities: The committee creates opportunities for students and faculty to network with industry professionals, fostering connections and collaboration.

The Computer Science Advisory Committee’s collective knowledge, industry insights, and commitment to innovation make them invaluable in ensuring that the institution remains at the forefront of technological advancements and that graduates are well-prepared for successful careers in all fields of the computer science industry.

For more information, please contact POC: Dr. Kelly Trahan at ktrahan@lccc.edu.

Activities for Cyber Security Students

Cybersecurity games and activities are an excellent way to study and learn about cybersecurity in a way that is fun and interactive. Following are competitions, free games, and activities that can be played to increase knowledge and skills:

Crack the Code 

Crack the Code – It’s that time again. The Hour of Code has arrived! Everyone is counting on you to showcase your big project but it looks like you’ve been hacked! Your arch nemesis has hacked your computer and taken over your program. You have to crack the code to get it back. Provide screenshots of all codes you cracked to get credit

Cybermission

Cybermission – This is more than just a game, it’s a test of your cyber skills. Defeat every stage and you’ll be worthy of the Ultimate Challenge. Hungry for more? Discover the roles that make up the nation’s elite military cyber warfare teams.

Cybersecurity Jeopardy

Cybersecurity Jeopardy – Learn cybersecurity concepts jeopardy style.

Cybersecurity Knowledge Quiz

Cybersecurity Knowledge Quiz – Test your knowledge on cybersecurity topics and terms by taking our 10-question quiz.

CyberStart Go

CyberStart Go, Looking to solve some free cyber security puzzles and trial CyberStart? Find similar challenges to CyberStart Go in the Intern base.

Data Center Attack

Data Center Attack – A choose your own adventure style game where you play the role of a Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) making decisions for a hospital. Game starts out with a worst case scenario and then rolls back time so you can play the main character as they attempt to setup security for the hospital.

Interland

Interland is an adventure-packed online game that puts the key lessons of digital citizenship and safety into hands-on practice.

Living Security

Living Security – Creates Online team-based training on Cybersecurity that creates an engaging gamified experience for all levels of employees.

picoCTF

picoCTF gamifies learning hacking with capture-the-flag puzzles created by trusted computer security and privacy experts at Carnegie Mellon University.

PBS Cybersecurity Lab

PBS Cybersecurity Lab – Take cybersecurity into your own hands. In this Lab, you’ll defend a company that is the target of increasingly sophisticated cyber attacks. Your task is to strengthen your cyber defenses and thwart the attackers by completing a series of cybersecurity challenges. You’ll crack passwords, craft code, and defeat malicious hackers.

Targeted Attack: The Game

Targeted Attack: The Game, you are in the driving seat. You are the CIO of a global organization called The Fugle, on the verge of making the first release of a biometrically authenticated mobile payment app. You will steer the project through its final stages, dealing with your internal security team, your colleagues in Marketing and PR and of course your CEO. Based on the format of the old “Choose Your Own Adventure” books, the game offers you the chance to step into someone else’s shoes and find out if you’re good enough to come out on top. Will you make the right decision?

The Weakest Link – Any organization is only as secure as you. Play the game!

University of Texas A&M

University of Texas A&M – Each year, the Texas A&M Division of Information Technology creates a campus-wide IT security game for National Cyber Security Awareness Month. Check out their games!