Learning Communities

What are LCs?
Our Learning Communities (or LCs) are designed to give you what you want and need in order to be successful in many aspects of your life.

To thrive in most careers and in community organizations, both local and global, you need to be able to work together with groups of people to solve problems, to construct knowledge, to determine policies, and to seize opportunities. You also need to be able to understand how differing areas, fields, or disciplines approach situations, problems, processes, and concepts of interest.

Without a developed sense of community--of 'common unity' in meeting the needs of clients, customers, and our communities--businesses, services, industries, and social and political groups of all kinds struggle to be successful.

We believe that success shouldn't be a struggle, so we design LCs to help you gain the knowledge, skills, and experience that you need.

Who can enroll in LCs?
We have learning communities for all kinds of students:

students who need further preparation in order to meet the demands of college coursework
transfer students beginning or continuing their college coursework at LCCC
high-achieving honors students who want challenging academic opportunities before transferring to colleges and universities anywhere.

How do LCs work?
Our LCs link two or more courses together: one group of students takes both classes, and instructors coordinate their materials and assignments around a unifying theme or problem.

For instance, two instructors can combine College English II and Abnormal Psychology to study "Psychology in Literature"--particularly the abnormal kinds.

Likewise, instructors can connect developmental math with writing to improve students' learning in both courses.

All these connections improve your learning experience, making your time here more valuable.

Need more reasons to join an LC?

Our LCs link two or more courses together: one group of students takes both classes, and instructors coordinate their materials and assignments around a unifying theme or problem.

For instance, two instructors can combine College English II and Abnormal Psychology to study "Psychology in Literature"--particularly the abnormal kinds.

Likewise, instructors can connect developmental math with writing to improve students' learning in both courses.

All these connections improve your learning experience, making your time here more valuable.

Need more reasons to join an LC?

Click here for the PDF.